Pa. Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar resigns

The resignation comes after the Department of State was found to have not properly advertised a proposed amendment before it was set to appear on the ballot for voters.

Governor Tom Wolf announced on Monday that Pa. Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar is resigning from her position.

The resignation comes after the Department of State was found to have not properly advertised a proposed amendment before it was set to appear on the ballot for voters. This means that it will be another two years before voters will be able to make a decision on this issue.

The amendment to the state’s constitution in question is for survivors of child sexual abuse, extending the time frame within which they can seek to sue or press charges. Many survivors of childhood sexual assault could not seek justice because of the statute-of-limitations on these cases in Pennsylvania. With the passing of this amendment, it would allow them to sue or otherwise take legal action even after they have turned 18 with the help of a two-year reprieve.

Because the Department of State did not follow the legal protocols in place for such amendments, PA residents will not be able to vote for or against the issue on May 18, 2021, as planned. This was because of an oversight from leaders in the Department of State, namely Boockvar. Now the process which has taken two years until this point will start all over again.

Many leaders in the state senate, both Democratic and Republican, have expressed their outrage and frustration at the oversight.

In a statement released by Gov. Tom Wolf, he said the following:

“The delay caused by this human error will be heartbreaking for thousands of survivors of childhood sexual assault, advocates and legislators, and I join the Department of State in apologizing to you. I share your anger and frustration that this happened, and I stand with you in your fight for justice.”

Victims of childhood sexual abuse who are beyond the reporting window now cannot seek legal recourse until at least 2023. This may be longer than the reprieve from the statute-of-limitations would allow for them, meaning many victims may never get legal justice for their abusers.